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Contact Lenses Wear & Care Do’s and Don’ts

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Contact Lenses & Eye Care

Here’s a shocking statistic: According to the CDC, more than 99% of the people who wear contact lenses in the U.S. engage in at least one risky or unsanitary behavior with their lenses!

Contact lenses are a safe and convenient way to correct your vision — as long as they are worn and cared for properly. Engaging in risky behavior when it comes to your lenses can put you at risk of developing eye infections or cause eye damage.

So, if you wear contact lenses, continue reading to learn the correct contact lens protocol. To ask any questions about your contact lenses or schedule a contact lens consultation, call Yesnick Vision Center in Las Vegas today.

The Do’s of Contact Lens Wear and Care

  • We can’t stress this enough: Do wash your hands! Before touching your eyes or handling your lenses, thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water. After rinsing, dry your hands on a paper towel or clean lint-free cloth.
  • Do disinfect your lenses when you remove them from your eyes, using only solutions recommended by your eye doctor.
  • Do remove your contact lenses before sleeping, swimming, and showering. Contact lenses and water do not mix due to the risk of infection.
  • Do clean your contact lens case weekly with warm soapy water and replace it every 3 months.
  • Do carry a pair of glasses with you in case you need to remove your contact lenses.

The Don’ts of Contact Lens Wear and Care

  • Don’t overwear your lenses. Replace them as often as your doctor recommends. So, replace your monthlies every month, your weeklies every week, and discard daily lenses before bedtime.
  • Don’t rub your eyes while wearing contact lenses.
  • Don’t use tap water or saliva (ever!) to rinse or rewet your contact lenses.
  • Don’t allow makeup to get into your eyes when wearing contact lenses.
  • Don’t share your contact lenses with anyone — seriously, don’t.
  • Don’t wear your contact lenses if your eyes feel irritated or appear red. Give them a chance to de-stress before inserting them back into your eyes.
  • Don’t skip your annual eye exam. Your eyes will thank you.

Contact Lenses – Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Las Vegas, Nevada. Visit Yesnick Vision Center for contact lenses and trendy eyeglasses that match your style.

Whether you wear contact lenses or not, regular eye exams can help detect eye disease early and give you a chance to discuss all of your eye-related concerns with your eye doctor. To schedule your annual eye exam, call Yesnick Vision Center in Las Vegas today!

Frequently Asked Questions with DR. YESNICK

Q: Can you request lenses made from glass? Is glass still used for lenses?

  • A: Yes. Opticians still sometimes use glass for lenses. However, glass is not used very often because they aren’t as safe. If these glass lenses breaks, they can shatters into many pieces and can injure the eye. Glass lenses are much heavier than plastic lenses, so they can make your eyeglasses less comfortable to wear.

Q: Can a coating be added to eyeglasses to protect them from further scratches?

  • A: A protective coating can’t be added to a lens after it’s scratched. The coating is applied when the lens is manufactured and can’t be put on later.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Las Vegas, Nevada. Visit YESnick Vision Cente for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

6 Contact Lens Tips for Winter Weather

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Contact Lens Eye Exam | Yesnick Vision Center

Winter’s cold, brisk, windy outdoor weather coupled with hot and dry indoor heating can take a toll on your eyes — especially if you wear contact lenses.

Neither situation is ideal for optimal eye comfort, so what can you do to make wearing contact lenses more comfortable this winter? Below are a few tips to help you navigate the winter contact lens wearing issue. However, if you still have questions about your contact lenses or general eye health, contact Yesnick Vision Center in Las Vegas and we’ll be happy to help!

Tips For Contact Lens Comfort This Winter

1. Stay Hydrated

Since the eyes are part of an entire system, a dehydrated body means dehydrated eyes. This can lead to eye redness, irritation, grittiness, and other symptoms of dry eye syndrome. So make sure you stay hydrated by drinking at least 8 cups of water a day. And no, coffee and alcohol don’t count!

2. Put Moisture Back Into the Air

Heating systems are notorious for causing eye dryness and irritation. Whether you have central vent heating, a fireplace, a space heater, or wall radiator — you’ll want to combat the arid air with a cool-mist humidifier. Your eyes will thank you for it!

3. Don’t Overwear Your Contacts

Each pair of contact lenses is designed to be worn for a specific amount of time. Whether it’s for the number of hours you wear them per day or how frequently they need to be replaced with a fresh pair. So make sure to follow your eye doctor’s instructions to avoid eye discomfort.

4. Give Your Eyes a Break

If the weather is making your contact lenses uncomfortable, why not wear your specs from time to time? It can change up your look and give your eyeballs a rest. Consider removing your contacts when you’re home from work or school and see how you feel.

5. Protect Your Eyes With Sunglasses

Sunglasses are a year-round must, but even more so for contact lens wearers! Cool winds and even light breezes can cause the moist surface of your eyes to evaporate more quickly. Wearing shades helps maintain ocular hydration.

And don’t forget – always wear a quality pair of sunglasses that offer 100% UV protection.

6. Visit Your Eye Doctor

If your contact lenses aren’t feeling as comfortable as they should this winter season, the best thing you can do for your eyes is to schedule a contact lens consultation with your eye doctor.

Sometimes, contact lens discomfort is due to ill-fitting lenses. In such cases, trying a different type or brand of contact lens may be the solution. If winter dryness is the problem, your eye doctor may prescribe lubricating drops or lenses designed to retain moisture.

Our dedicated staff is committed to helping you achieve the highest level of comfort and visual clarity.

Don’t let contact lens irritation get in your way of enjoying winter. We can help! Contact us to schedule an eye exam or to ask any questions you may have.

Frequently Asked Questions with DR. YESNICK

Q: Can you request lenses made from glass? Is glass still used for lenses?

  • A: Yes. Opticians still sometimes use glass for lenses. However, glass is not used very often because they aren’t as safe. If these glass lenses breaks, they can shatters into many pieces and can injure the eye. Glass lenses are much heavier than plastic lenses, so they can make your eyeglasses less comfortable to wear.

Q: Can a coating be added to eyeglasses to protect them from further scratches?

  • A: A protective coating can’t be added to a lens after it’s scratched. The coating is applied when the lens is manufactured and can’t be put on later.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Las Vegas, Nevada. Visit YESnick Vision Cente for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

Are Contact Lenses Safe For Young Children?

Here’s a question we often get at our practice: ‘Is my child too young for contact lenses?’ This is an important question, and the answer may surprise you.

For children with myopia (nearsightedness), contact lenses can be a convenient method of vision correction. It allows kids to go about their day without having to worry about breaking or misplacing their glasses, and enables them to freely participate in sports and other physical activities.

Some children and young teens may ask their parents for contact lenses because they feel self-conscious wearing glasses. Contact lenses may even provide children with the confidence boost they need to come out of their shell. Moreover, these days, it is very popular for children to wear single-use one-day disposable soft contacts, since there is no cleaning or maintenance involved.

Some parents may deny their child’s request for contacts due to concerns about eye health and safety. There’s no reason to worry: contact lenses are just as safe for children as they are for anyone else.

At Yesnick Vision Center, we provide children, teens, and patients of all ages with a wide variety of contact lenses. If you’re concerned about the safety of contacts for your child, we’ll be happy to explain and explore ways to ensure maximum safety, optimal eye health and comfort. To learn more or to schedule a pediatric eye exam for contact lenses, contact us today.

What Are the Risks of Having My Child Wear Contact Lenses?

A study published in the January 2021 issue of The Journal of Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics found that kids aren’t at a higher risk of experiencing contact lens complications.

The study followed nearly 1000 children aged 8-16 over the course of 1.5-3 years to determine how contact lenses affected their eye health.

The results indicate that age doesn’t have an effect on contact lens safety. In fact, the researchers found that the risk of developing infections or other adverse reactions was less than 1% per year of wear — which is comparable to contact lens wearers of other ages.

But before you decide that contact lenses are right for your child, you may want to consider whether your child is ready to wear them. During his or her eye doctor’s appointment, the optometrist may ask about your child’s level of maturity, responsibility, and personal hygiene. Since many children are highly motivated to wear contacts, they tend to display real maturity in caring for their lenses. That said, in the initial stages, parents may need to play an active role, as their child gets used to inserting and removing the new contact lenses.

It’s important to note that just as with any other medical device, contact lenses are not risk-free. Anyone who wears contact lenses has a chance of developing eye infections or other complications with contact lenses. However, when worn and cared for according to your eye doctor’s instructions, contact lenses are low-risk and perfectly safe for children and teenagers.

So, go ahead and bring your child in for a contact lens consultation! We’ll help determine if your child is ready for contacts and answer any questions you or your child may have. To schedule your child’s contact lens fitting or eye exam, contact Yesnick Vision Center in Las Vegas today.

The Importance of Eye Exams for Contact Lenses

Are you planning on wearing contact lenses for the first time? Do you need a new contact lens prescription? Are your current contacts not as comfortable as you wish they were? Your eye doctor will perform a contact lens eye exam to ensure that your vision with contacts is clear, comfortable, and safe, providing you with the right lenses for you.

What is a contact lens exam?

If you wear or want to wear contact lenses, you’ll need an eye exam for contact lenses, in addition to your regular comprehensive eye exam. Special tests are performed during a contact lens exam to evaluate your eyes and vision with contacts.

Are eyeglass prescriptions the same as contact lens prescriptions?

No, a prescription for glasses cannot be used for contact lenses. An eyeglass prescription is for lenses that are positioned approximately 12 millimeters from your eyes, whereas a contact lens prescription is measured for lenses that sit directly on the surface of your eye.

The prescription for contact lenses also includes the brand, lens diameter and curvature, which are not part of an eyeglass prescription.

Contact lenses fitting: One size does not fit all

One contact lens size doesn’t fit all eyes. If a contact lens is too flat or too steep for your corneal shape, you may experience discomfort or even eye damage. Your eye doctor will take certain measurements to determine the best contact lens design and fit for your eyes.

Corneal curvature

This measures the curvature of your eye’s clear front surface (cornea) so the eye doctor can select the optimal curve and diameter for your contact lenses. If your eye’s surface is somewhat irregular because of astigmatism or other conditions, you may require a special lens.

Pupil and iris size

The size of your pupil and iris (the colored part of your eye) is also important in determining the best contact lens design.

Tear film evaluation

This test evaluates the quality of your tears, to determine whether they will be able to keep contact lenses and your cornea sufficiently hydrated throughout the day. If you have dry eye disease, standard contact lenses may not be right for you.

Trial lenses

Following the eye exam, you will be provided with trial lenses to verify that the chosen contact lenses offer clear and comfortable vision. This will allow the eye doctor to make any fine adjustments to the prescription.

Contact Lens Eye Exam Near You

Wearing the correct contact lenses for your eyes allows you to enjoy all of the benefits of wearing contacts, while keeping your eyes healthy and comfortable.

If you’re already a contact lens wearer, visit your eye doctor at least once a year to make sure the lenses are still providing you with optimum vision and comfort.

Contact Yesnick Vision Center in Las Vegas to book your contact lens eye exam today!

What is a Contact Lens Specialist? Do You Need One?

Hard-to-fit with contact lenses? Consult with our eye doctor in Las Vegas

In just about every field of healthcare, there are specialists with expertise in treating specific conditions – and eye care is no exception. When it comes to vision, certain ocular conditions are better treated by a specialist than by a general eye care provider. A specialist will have more extensive experience and training that enables you to benefit from more advanced, progressive treatments. At Yesnick Vision Center, our eye doctor is a contact lens specialist. That means we use the latest technologies and techniques to ensure that even hard-to-fit patients can enjoy clear, comfortable vision with contacts.

Have you found it difficult to achieve sharp, stable sight with standard contact lenses? Visit our contact lens specialist in Las Vegas, Nevada, for a precise fitting and customized vision solution.

What conditions require a contact lens specialist?

When regular contact lenses are painful or always uncomfortable, it’s a sign that you may need specialty lenses for a hard-to-fit condition or visual disorder, such as:

  • Keratoconus or other corneal irregularity
  • Extreme astigmatism
  • Sensitive cornea
  • Dry eye syndrome

If you have any ocular condition that prevents you from wearing regular contact lenses comfortably and with visual clarity, contact an eye doctor near you for a consultation.

What does a contact lens specialist do?

At our Las Vegas eye care centers, we are equipped with a range of high-tech devices and diagnostics, including digital imaging tools with superior resolution and advanced corneal topography. Our eye doctor will use these tools to create contact lenses for you that are custom-fit. The most commonly crafted type of specialty contacts are scleral lenses and Ortho-k (orthokeratology) lenses. Bifocal and multifocal contact lenses, and gas permeable contact lenses are other kinds of specialty contacts for hard-to-fit conditions.

Questions? Book an appointment at Yesnick Vision Center so our contact lens specialist can help you.

At Yesnick Vision Center, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 702-500-0525 or book an appointment online to see one of our Las Vegas eye doctors.

Want to Learn More? Read on!

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UV Safety Awareness Month

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Contact Lenses & UV Protection

When you think of effective ways to protect your body against UV rays, you probably think of sunscreen and sunglasses. But now, contact lenses also deserve a prominent place in that thought. As many premium eyewear manufacturers have sharpened their focus on eye health, they’ve incorporated advanced technology into their prescription contact lenses designs to provide UV protection.

According to The Vision Council, a US nonprofit organization dedicated to research and professional training in the optical industry, if the average adult in America spent just a half-hour wearing sunglasses with proper UV protection daily, they’d gain approximately 183 hours of UV-free time for their eyes throughout the year – which is significant towards slowing the progression of sight-threatening eye disease. However, sunglasses don’t provide total protection. By adding a pair of contacts, you can boost protection for your lasting eye health.

At Yesnick Vision Center, we want to help you keep your eyes healthy! In addition to a full display of stylish, quality sunglasses, we offer the latest contact lenses with UV protection for a wide range of vision prescriptions. Pop in anytime to view our optical collection in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Sunglasses vs. contact lenses with UV protection

The American Optometric Association recommends wearing sunglasses that block 99-100% of UVA and UVB rays. However, even if the lenses feature this level of UV protection, not all sunglasses designs protect your eyes fully, because they allow sun rays to enter from the sides. Think about it, when UV rays reflect off water, snow, sand, nearby building windows and white concrete, they generally don’t hit your eyes face-on, rather, they shine on you from all sides. Peripheral protection given by sunglasses is minimal, and sun rays can reach your delicate eye tissues.

Contact lenses with UV protection cover your iris completely, providing enhanced protection for your eyes – especially for the retina, the part of your eyes that’s most sensitive to light.

Ultimate UV protection for your eyes

To maximize the health of your peepers – especially if you require prescription eyewear to see clearly – pair sunglasses that fully block UVA and UVB rays with contact lenses that have built-in UV protection. You can wear prescription contact lenses and top them with a trending pair of designer frames.

To reduce your risk of UV exposure, speak to us about your outdoor activities. Our Las Vegas optical staff will be happy to match you with the best combo of sunglasses and contact lenses for your prescription, lifestyle requirements and favored fashion statement.

At Yesnick Vision Center, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 702-500-0525 or book an appointment online to see one of our Las Vegas eye doctors.

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Don’t Do These 11 Things If You Wear Daily Disposable Contacts!

Countless people around the world wear daily disposable contact lenses or dailies. These popular single-use lenses are removed and discarded at the end of each day, and a new, fresh pair is inserted the next morning. Used properly, dailies promote eye health, and they’re comfortable and convenient.

Despite the many advantages associated with wearing daily disposables, there are plenty of ways you can damage your eyes and vision — some you may never have considered.

1. Don’t Touch Contacts with Dirty Hands

Before touching your lenses, make sure to wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water. By touching your contact lenses with dirty hands, you transfer bacteria to your lenses, which can lead to an infection. Preferably dry your hands with a disposable paper towel rather than a cloth towel, and ensure that no remnants of the towel remain on your fingers.

2. Don’t Expose Your Contacts to Water

Any source of water, whether tap, pool, or lake water, can change the shape of your lenses and cause micro-abrasions on your cornea. Plus, the water may contain bacteria that can wreak havoc on your eye health and cause you to experience temporary vision loss or even permanent blindness.

If you must get in the water with your contacts on, make sure to wear waterproof goggles. If you do get water on your contact lenses, dispose of these lenses and insert a new pair. Exposing contact lenses to chemicals like chlorine binds to the lens and cannot be cleaned off. It then leeches onto the cornea and causes irritation.

The next time you’re tempted to swim or shower with your lenses on, think twice before doing so.

3. Don’t Reuse Your Contacts

Daily disposable contacts are designed to be thrown away after every single use, and people who reuse them risk painful and risky outcomes. Dailies are thinner, more fragile, and don’t hold moisture as well as other contacts.

Users sometimes attempt to increase the lifespan of these lenses by cleaning them in a disinfecting solution and wearing them for several days or even weeks at a time. This is problematic, as the lens material doesn’t allow for repeated disinfecting. In fact, the process of cleaning the lenses tends to be not only ineffective but also breaks down the lens itself, increasing the risk of the lens falling apart while in the eye. The risk of complications and infection is not worth the few saved bucks.

4. Don’t Insert a Dropped Contact In Your Eye

One of the perks of daily lenses is that they are less expensive (per lens) than other types of contacts. So if you find yourself dropping a lens into the sink or on the floor, don’t bother placing it back in your eye. Doing so can cost you your eye health.

5. Don’t Ever Put Contacts In Your Mouth

It seems like a funny concept, doesn’t it? You wouldn’t believe the number of people who do this. If you drop a contact lens, avoid rooting around the floor trying to find it, and if you do, definitely don’t put it in your mouth to lubricate it. Your mouth contains bacteria that can infect your eyes once you reinsert your contacts.

Play it safe by carrying around an emergency pair of glasses or an extra pair of daily disposable contacts in your bag, your car, or at work.

6. Don’t Overwear Your Daily Lenses

Wearing your lenses for long periods of time can damage your eyes, even if they’re daily contacts. The maximum recommended daily use for any contact lens is 14-16 hours, though Dr. David Yesnick will determine the exact number of hours you should wear your lenses. Your eyes, just like any other part of your body, need to rest. Your corneas receive oxygen from the air, not from blood vessels, and while it’s healthy to wear contacts during the day, wearing them for extended periods can significantly reduce the amount of oxygen your eyes receive, which can lead to complications. If you don’t give your eyes the rest they need, your corneas might get swollen, which can lead to corneal abrasion and even bacterial infection.

7. Don’t Sleep With Your Lenses

Daily lenses should never be worn overnight. You’re risking your sight by sleeping in a lens that’s not approved for overnight use, as it can lead to ocular irritation, swelling and corneal ulcers.

8. Don’t Insert Contacts Before Completing Your Morning Routine

Avoid inserting your contacts before you shower or wash your face, since you risk exposing your lenses to tap water and the bacteria that come with it. We also recommend that you insert your lenses after blow-drying and styling your hair, especially if you’re using hairspray or other aerosols, as these products can dry out your contacts. Additionally, the spray can coat the lenses and leave a film that not only irritates the eyes, but can make it difficult to see. If you’re at the hairdresser’s and cannot remove your lenses, shut your eyes when spray is applied.

9. Don’t Get Makeup On Your Contacts

Insert your contacts before applying makeup, because any makeup residue on your hands, such as mascara, can easily transfer to your lenses.

It’s not uncommon for people to get concealer, eyeliner or mascara on their contact lenses. If that happens, immediately remove the lens and clean the makeup with solution (while making sure to dispose of the lens before bed). Otherwise, simply replace with another lens. Avoid wearing waterproof makeup, since it can’t always be removed from your lenses, even when rinsed with solution.

To prevent makeup from getting on your lenses, don’t apply mascara all the way from the base of your lashes up. Instead, apply it from the midway point. It’s also important not to apply eyeliner on the inner lid of your eye, but rather to the skin above your lashes.

10. Don’t Wear Contact Lenses If Your Eyes Are Irritated

As the saying goes, “if in doubt – take them out!” If your eyes feel irritated, uncomfortable, or if you notice any pain or redness, don’t power through. If your symptoms last a while, contact Dr. David Yesnick at Yesnick Vision Center. You don’t want to let a serious infection go unchecked.

When your eyes feel more rested and are free of discomfort, put in a fresh pair of contacts.

11. Don’t Rub Your Eyes

If your eyes feel itchy or dry, or if a lens feels out of place, you may be tempted to rub your eyes. But rubbing, whether with contacts or without, can lead to long-term ocular issues. This may cause you to experience blurred vision, and may even damage your cornea. Instead, Dr. David Yesnick can recommend eye drops to relieve any discomfort. Make sure to apply them only when contact lenses are removed.

Above, we have delved into things you should never do with daily contact lenses. Fortunately, if you do make a mistake, you can remove the lens and replace it with a fresh one. The few dollars you might save by not opening a new pack aren’t worth the damage a mistake can cause.

If you have any questions or are interested in finding out more about contact lenses, contact Yesnick Vision Center in Las Vegas today. Dr. David Yesnick will be happy to explain how to care for your eyes and maintain your vision.

Can Contact Lenses Get Stuck in My Eye?

If you’ve always wondered (or worried) about your contact lenses getting stuck in your eyes, you’re in good company. Many new contact lens wearers have this concern! To relieve your fears – no, it’s impossible for contacts to get totally stuck behind your eyes. However, they can become dislodged and get stuck beneath your eyelid. In fact, many people call our Las Vegas, Nevada, eye doctor for help when this happens. Usually, we can provide tips for how to remove the contact on your own, but when this doesn’t work – you’ll need to visit Dr. David Yesnick at Yesnick Vision Center for assistance.

Facts about when contact lenses get stuck

  • When a contact lens dries out, it can get stuck to your cornea. This happens most frequently as a result of sleeping with lenses.
  • Contact lenses can get dislodged and move out of position under your eyelid. Typically, this occurs due to rubbing your eyes or physical contact with the lenses.
  • Pieces of contact lenses can stay in your eye for a long time, unintentionally. Sometimes a fragment of torn lens gets stuck under the eyelid. Rinsing your eyes with saline will generally loosen the lens so you can remove it gently and easily.
  • Contact lenses cannot slide behind your eye, getting stuck there forever. While contacts may get lodged under your eyelid, your eyelids serve as a barrier to block anything from slipping behind your eyeball.
  • Contact lenses stuck in your eye do not seriously endanger your health. It may not be good for you, but a lens that’s stuck will generally do nothing more than cause irritation.

How can I remove a soft contact lens that’s stuck in my eye?

  1. First of all, wash your hands with soap and dry on a lint-free towel.
  2. Rewetting eye drops are pretty much all you need. Don’t be economical when you use them, because the more moisture you add to your eye, the better the chances that the lens will simply dislodge and slip out on its own. Close your eyes and blink repeatedly to disperse the lubricating fluid.
  3. If applying eye drops doesn’t do the trick, then gently massage the upper and lower portions of your eyelid until the lens comes out. The key word here is “gently,” don’t apply any forceful pressure.
  4. If a mild massage doesn’t release the lens, then grip your eyelid and flip it upwards (inside out). Look in the mirror to search for any pieces of your lens and carefully remove them. Afterwards, rinse your eye with saline.
  5. If none of these techniques work for you, double check to make sure the lens didn’t fall out already (and you’re just feeling the sensation left by mild irritation). If the lens is still there, please call our Las Vegas, Nevada, eye doctor and schedule an urgent eye exam.

What do I do if my hard gas permeable contacts get stuck?

If you wear hard contact lenses, you’ll need to handle a stuck lens differently from a soft lens.

Applying rewetting eye drops is an essential first step. Then, close your eyes and blink. This may be sufficient to dislodge the lens, moving it back to the center of your eye where you can remove it as usual.

With hard contact lenses, don’t massage your eyelid! This can cause the lens to scrape your cornea, leading to a painful corneal abrasion.

If lubricating the lens doesn’t help, use your fingertip to gently press your eye near the edge of your contact lens. This can break the suction, unsticking the lens so you can remove it easily. Or, pick up a special suction cup device (sold with the contact lenses products in most stores) that can attached to your lens to gently pull it off from your eye surface.

Why does my eye hurt after removing a stuck contact lens?

Generally, this is just a symptom caused by mild irritation. Sterile saline or artificial tears eye drops can help moisten your eye to enhance comfort. With a bit of time, the irritation will usually disappear.

However, if the pain persists and your eye appears red, reach out to our Las Vegas, Nevada, eye care center for instructions. You’ll need an eye exam to determine if any medical treatment is necessary.

At Yesnick Vision Center, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 702-500-0525 or book an appointment online to see one of our Las Vegas eye doctors.

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Cosmetic Contact Lenses Can Hide Visual Disfigurement & Revitalize Your Life

Revolutionary prosthetic contacts can be the ultimate aesthetic solution

When most people hear the term “contact lenses,” they think of a convenient way to correct vision – an effective alternative to eyeglasses. However, contact lenses have purposes that go beyond giving 20/20 vision. Cosmetic contact lenses, also called prosthetic contact lenses, are a type of eyewear that’s also intended for covering up ocular disfigurements. These specialty contact lenses can be life-changers: enhancing appearance, boosting self-confidence, and enhancing quality of life for people with eyes that don’t look normal or healthy.

At Yesnick Vision Center, we fit patients with all types of contact lenses, including prosthetic contact lenses; schedule a consultation at our Las Vegas, Nevada, eye care center to learn how we can transform your look with cosmetic contact lenses.

What disfiguring eye conditions can be helped with contacts?

Certain eye conditions or injuries can damage the cornea or other parts of the eye in a way that causes disfigurement. Problems that may lead to an eye deformity include:

  • Eye trauma
  • Eye infections
  • Surgical complications
  • Retinal detachments
  • Glaucoma
  • Sjogren’s syndrome
  • Herpes in the eye
  • Congenital defects (eg. aniridia – being born without an iris, or albinism)
  • Being born with strange pigmentation around the cornea, or a bluish, cloudy cornea

How are these kinds of visual disfigurement treated?

Specialty prosthetic contact lenses can be an ideal solution for hiding eye deformities. If you have a refractive condition, these cosmetic contacts can also improve your vision quality. Basically, they are made with an opaque design that mimics the natural appearance of the eye, instead of being transparent like standard contact lenses.

When we fit patients with cosmetic contact lenses, our Las Vegas, Nevada, eye doctor uses corneal topography to measure the corneal curvature for a comfortable fit. We also consider the color, shape, hue, and details of the person’s natural eye – in order to design these custom contacts to be as close a match as possible.

When the cosmetic lens is worn, the disfigured eye will appear totally normal to outsiders. People who used to be self-conscious about appearing in public no longer have to worry about attracting stares. They can live normally, without constant embarrassment and with a healthy sense of self-esteem.

Do prosthetic contact lenses have a function beyond being cosmetic?

Yes, prosthetic lenses can also enhance visual acuity, comfort, and ocular health. If you have a visibly deformed eye, you may still have vision in that eye but struggle constantly with symptoms such as light sensitivity, color blindness, reduced visual contrast, double vision, or other side effects. In addition to sharpening your vision, cosmetic contacts can be customized to control how much light enters your eye, reduce glare, and maximize your overall vision quality.

If you have an eye condition that allows too much light to reach the back of your eye, such as albinism or aniridia, prosthetic contact lenses also protect your eye health by blocking UV rays from causing damage.

Find out more about cosmetic and prosthetic contact lenses in Las Vegas, Nevada

To learn more about how these specialty lenses work and whether they can help you, visit our Las Vegas, Nevada, vision care center. We’ll work together with you to optimize the value of these transformative contact lenses for your appearance and your life!

At Yesnick Vision Center, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 702-500-0525 or book an appointment online to see one of our Las Vegas eye doctors.

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Coronavirus and Your Eyes – What You Should Know

As coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads around the world, health professionals are demanding that people limit their personal risk of contracting the virus by thoroughly washing their hands, practicing social distancing, and not touching their nose, mouth, or eyes. In fact, it may surprise you to learn that the eyes play an important role in spreading COVID-19.

Coronavirus is transmitted from person to person through droplets that an infected person sneezes or coughs out. These droplets can easily enter your body through the mucous membranes on the face, such as your nose, mouth, and yes — your eyes.

But First, What Is Coronavirus?

Coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, causes mild to severe respiratory illness associated with fever, coughing, and shortness of breath. Symptoms typically appear within 2 weeks of exposure. Those with acute cases of the virus can develop pneumonia and other life-threatening complications.

Here’s what you should know:

Guard Your Eyes Against COVID-19

  • Avoid rubbing your eyes. Although we all engage in this very normal habit, try to fight the urge to touch your eyes. If you absolutely must, first wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Tears carry the virus. Touching tears or a surface where tears have fallen can spread coronavirus. Make sure to wash your hands after touching your eyes and throughout the day as well.
  • Disinfect surfaces. You can catch COVID-19 by touching an object or surface that has the virus on it, such as a door knob, and then touching your eyes.

Coronavirus and Pink Eye

Pink eye, or conjunctivitis, refers to an inflammation of the membrane covering the front of the eyeball. Conjunctivitis is characterized by red, watery, and itchy eyes. Viral conjunctivitis is highly contagious and can be spread by coughing and sneezing, too.

According to a recent study in China, viral conjunctivitis may be a symptom of COVID-19. The study found conjunctival congestion in 9 of the 1,099 patients (0.8%) who were confirmed to have coronavirus.

If you suspect you have pink eye, call your eye doctor in Las Vegas right away. Given the current coronavirus crisis, we ask patients to call prior to presenting themselves at the office of Dr. David Yesnick, as it will allow the staff to assess your condition and adequately prepare for your visit.

Contact Lenses or Eyeglasses?

Many people who wear contact lenses are thinking about switching to eyeglasses for the time being to lower the threat of being infected with coronavirus.

Wearing glasses may provide an extra layer of protection if someone coughs on you; hopefully that infected droplet will hit the lens and not your eye. However, one must still be cautious, as the virus can reach the eyes from the exposed sides, tops and bottoms around your frames. Unlike specialized safety goggles, glasses are not considered a safe way to prevent coronavirus.

Contact Lenses and COVID-19

If you wear contacts, make sure to properly wash your hands prior to removing or inserting them. Consider ordering a 3 to 6 month supply of contact lenses and solution; some opticals provide home delivery of contact lenses and solutions. At this stage there is no recommendation to wear daily lenses over monthlies.

Don’t switch your contact lens brand or solution, unless approved by your optometrist or optician.

Regularly Disinfect Glasses

Some viruses such as coronavirus, can remain on hard surfaces from several hours to days. This can then be transmitted to the wearer’s fingers and face. People who wear reading glasses for presbyopia should be even more careful, because they usually need to handle their glasses more often throughout the day, and older individuals tend to be more vulnerable to COVID-19 complications. Gently wash the lenses and frames with warm water and soap, and dry your eyeglasses using a microfiber cloth.

Stock up on Eye Medicine

It’s a good idea to stock up on important medications, including eye meds, in order to get by in case you need to be quarantined or if supplies run short. This may not be possible for everyone due to insurance limitations. If you cannot stock up, make sure to request a refill as soon as you’re due and never wait until the last minute to contact your pharmacy.

It is important that you continue to follow your doctor’s instructions for all medications.

Digital Devices and Eyestrain

At times like this, people tend to use digital devices more than usual. Take note of tiredness, sore eyes, blurry vision, double vision or headaches, which are symptoms of computer vision syndrome if they are exacerbated by extensive use of digital devices, and might indicate a need for a new prescription in the near future. This usually isn’t urgent, but if you’re unsure, you can call our eye doctor’s office.

Children and Digital Devices

During this time your children may end up watching TV and using computers, tablets and smartphones more frequently and for more extended periods too. Computer vision syndrome, mentioned above, can affect children as well. We recommend limiting screen time to a maximum of 2 hours per day for children, though it’s understandably difficult to control under the circumstances.

Try to get your child to take a 10 to 15 minute break every hour, and stop all screen time for at least 60 minutes before sleep.

Children and Outdoor Play

Please follow local guidelines and instructions regarding outdoor activities for your children. If possible, it’s actually good for visual development to spend 1-2 hours a day outside.

 

From all of us at Yesnick Vision Center in Las Vegas, we wish you good health and please stay safe.

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